Q: Is there an equation that determines whether a question gets answered on ask a mathematician/physicist?

Mathematician: Yes, but neither the Physicist nor I know it, and its shortest representation in standard mathematical notation is much too long to ever be written down. More precisely, there are an infinite number of such equations. These equations “exist” in the same sense that an equation describing the current position of every hair on your head exists. But these equations do not exist in the same sense that Chicago exists.

 

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7 Responses to Q: Is there an equation that determines whether a question gets answered on ask a mathematician/physicist?

  1. huzzah says:

    How much data (questions and questions answered) would be necessary for finding an approximate equation that determines whether a question gets answered on ask a mathematician/physicist?

  2. Damon says:

    Perhaps you could throw buckingham pi theorem at that problem and get an equation that would work (maybe just about) .

  3. Ron says:

    Of course there is!! Probability ‘P’ = 0/0, lol

  4. Bob says:

    By the way, 0/0 equals any real number. Proof: To find the value of 1/2, you find a value, that, when multiplied by 2 (the denominator), equals 1. That value happens to be 0.5. Now, what value multiplied by 0 equals 0? Any real number! (new paragraph) This leads to another question: Are there an infinite number of theorems?

  5. Jacob Mahto says:

    This forms one of the applications of the M-theory ! By the way, How can a “theory of everything” decide its’ own outcome and whether it is false or true !

  6. Jim says:

    Bob, that is a very commonly held misconception. Division by 0 does not automatically mean division by any number. Equations must be reversible, and what do you multiply by 0 to yield 1/2? Anything x 0 = 0 is one of the most central rules in our modern understanding of Mathematics, one of the pillars upon which it is built. Not even multiplying 0 by infinity yields anything other than 0. Dividing by 0 is, therefore, undefined. Perhaps in the future we will have a way to understand the concept, but for now we don’t.

  7. Jim says:

    I think a better question to ask would be along the lines of: what is the method by which questions are selected to be answered? What process should I follow to maximize the chances of my question being answered?

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